Let’s Play Humpday Giveaway! #22 (July 23 Edition)

We’ve made it through another week and to another Wednesday which can only mean one thing, here on the BMag blog anyway, it’s time to play Humpday Giveaway!

It’s summertime in the Northern Hemisphere and it’s a time when many folks turn to the outdoors and travel, camping, and just hitting the open road. Well, what good is that if you can’t make awesome coffee long the way? Never fear! Humpday Giveaway and our great friends at Prima Coffee  Equipment are here to help!

One of the most important pieces of coffee equipment you can travel with is a grinder, and one of our favorite is the Hario Coffee Grinder Mini Mill Slim. Not only is it small and lightweight with conical ceramic burrs, it’s a snap to adjust!

The Hario Mini Mill Slim grinder is awesome for travel or around the house.
The Hario Mini Mill Slim grinder is awesome for travel or around the house.

Watch a demo of this sweet, handheld machine right here:

So now that you know the prize, we need a question for you to answer.

This week’s query comes from the pages of the June + July 2013 issue of Barista Magazine, well, that’s one of the places you can find the answer anyway. Specifically, you can find it in the latest installment of the Colombian Coffee Hub’s column.

Without further ado, here you go: At higher altitudes in coffee-growing regions, temperatures drop significantly at night. What effect does this have on the coffee cherry?

Think you know the answer? Then all you have to do is leave it in the comments section, along with your FIRST and LAST names. You have from when this post goes live (7:00AM PDT on July 24) until 6:59AM PDT on July 25 to respond. All correct responses (who have also given first and last names!) will be put in the drawing for a chance to win. The winner will be announced in a post on Thursday. (Please note, due to shipping restrictions, this week’s prize can only be mailed to U.S. addresses.)

Good luck to everyone and thanks for playing this week’s round of Humpday Giveaway!

About baristamagazine 1736 Articles
Barista Magazine is the leading trade magazine in the world for the professional coffee community.

39 Comments

  1. The temperature drops at high altitudes make the coffee tree produce more sugars, which are stored at the cherries, and allows the tree to protect itself. The result is a sweeter and more acidic coffee.

    Joaquin Garcia

  2. Cooler mountain temperatures provide a slower growth cycle for the coffee tree which prolongs bean development. This longer maturation process imbues the coffee bean with more complex sugars, yielding deeper, more interesting flavors.

  3. NAME: Chad Bledsoe

    the nightly temperature drops, at higher altitudes, cause the coffee tree to produce more sugars which are stored in the cherries.

    ANSWER: It causes the cherries to be sweeter and more acidic.

  4. It will lead to higher residual sugars in the cherries for more acidity and sweetness, Eric Berrong

  5. lower temperatures provide a slower growth cycle which prolongs bean development. Resulting in a more complex sugars and deeper flavors.

  6. Lower temps leave the plants susceptible to diseases, coffee rust being one of those.

  7. The coffee tree produces more sugars that are stored in the cherries and it allows the tree to protect itself. That’s why higher altitude coffees tend to be sweeter and more acidic…just the way I love them!

  8. Affects coffee production and quality, in particular with the onset of serious disease events such as the coffee rust epidemic currently affecting coffee plantations in Latin America.

    Robbie Melton

  9. The temperature drops make the coffee tree produce more sugars, which are stored in the cherries (allows the tree to protect itself). The cherries then become sweeter and more acidic.

  10. The temperature drop makes the coffee plant susceptible to diseases such as coffee rust

  11. Basically, the temp drop makes the trees produce more sugars, which is stored in the cherries and allows the trees to protect itself. The coffee tends to be sweeter and more acidic. Jacob Archer

  12. The nighttime temperatures at these heights drop significantly, without freezing, slowing the growth of the coffee cherries and allowing them to develop more concentrated flavors with better acidity.

  13. temperatures below 65 F make the coffee plant vulnerable to pests and diseases

  14. Affects coffee production and quality, in particular with the onset of serious disease events such as the coffee rust epidemic currently affecting coffee plantations in Latin America.

  15. It makes the coffee tree produce more sugars and allows the tree to protect itself.

  16. Affects coffee production and quality, in particular with the onset of serious disease events such as the coffee rust epidemic currently affecting coffee plantations in Latin America.

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