Let’s Play Barista Magazine’s Humpday Giveaway! #31 (September 25, 2013 Edition)

It’s here! It’s finally here! Hooray for almighty Wednesday! Happy Humpday all of you Barista Magazine readers, and thanks for stopping by Barista Magazine’s blog to play Humpday Giveaway this week!

We are so incredibly stoked about the amaze-balls prize that our friends at Espresso Parts are majorly hooking one of you lucky dogs up with this week ”seriously, I get all jealous of you guys when this kind of thing comes around…

This thing is beee-yu-ti-ful! And one of you lucky readers is going to win it! Thanks, Espresso Parts!!
This Silverton Coffee/Tea Dripper with Stainless Cone Filter is beee-yu-ti-ful! And one of you lucky readers is going to win it! Thanks, Espresso Parts!!

That’s right, folks: this week’s Humpday Giveaway prize is the SICK Silverton Coffee/Tea Dripper with Stainless Cone Filter. Can you believe how pretty this thing is? Wouldn’t it look so damn good on my ”err, I mean your ”kitchen counter? This baby sells for $96 ”that’s a lot of tip money, yo!

The stainless steel filter helps ensure a supremely clean cup.
The stainless steel filter helps ensure a supremely clean cup.

So before we go any farther, LET’S GIVE IT UP FOR ESPRESSO PARTS! Thanks, guys! And if you’re loving the Silverton Coffee/Tea Dripper, you should check out the other Yama products Espresso Parts offers ”they’re all hella fly looking and super efficient and easy to use. The Yama Coffee & Tea product line is available EXCLUSIVELY through Espresso Parts.

Espresso Parts is the exclusive distributor of Yama Glass Coffee and Tea products ”and this glass is unbelievably well suited to the work baristas do every single day.
Espresso Parts is the exclusive distributor of Yama Glass Coffee and Tea products ”and this glass is unbelievably well suited to the work baristas do every single day.

Yama Glass is based in Taiwan and has been around since 1978. Yama is known for its high-heat resistant hand-blown tea pots, coffee brewers, tea servers, tea cups, and tableware. Another reason Espresso Parts loves the Yama company? The Yama factory is totally environmentally sound, It’s certified by the government as a superior manufacturer conforming to environmental protection.

You want to know another thing that’s totally cool about the Silverton Coffee/Tea Dripper? You can brew hot OR cold on it! Isn’t that awesome? The whole set that one of you is going to win includes a stainless steel filter cone, a ceramic filter, and a drip control valve, which allws you to control immersion time and agitation! The stainless steel filter and ceramic filter produce a super clean cup, ready to serve from the very stylish glass handle bottom beaker.

I think I’m in love.

You can brew hot OR cold on the Silverton Coffee/Tea Dripper.
You can brew hot OR cold on the Silverton Coffee/Tea Dripper.

So OK, guys, let get this party started! Are you ready for this week’s Humpday Giveaway trivia question? Before we start, I just want to review the rules for you…

Humpday Giveaway Rules

”Answer the trivia question by referencing the  current issue of Barista Magazine. If you don’t have a copy, you can look at the whole issue for free online by going  HERE.

”Leave your answer plus your  FIRST and LAST names, as well as  your country of residence, into the blog comments section.

”Answers may be submitted between  7 a.m. PDT on Wednesday through 6:59 a.m. PDT on Thursday.

”The names of those who submitted the correct answer will be entered into a drawing, and Barista Magazine will randomly select one name, which will be announced on Thursday at 10 a.m. PDT right here on the Barista Magazine blog.

And this week, the big prize of the Silverton Coffee/Tea Dripper is only available to folks with a U.S. address. Because we don’t want any of our friends outside of the U.S. to miss out on the fun, we’re offering a one-year international subscription ”valued at $60 USD ”to someone from outside the U.S. who gets the answer right. So there’s something for everyone!

OK, ready to play? Here we go…

QUESTION: Where and when was coffee rust first discovered, according to the Colombian Coffee Hub’s column in the August+September issue?

Rust blows. I took this photo in El Salvador in January of 2012. It devastated an enormous amount of the coffee growing areas of Central America in 2012, the results of which coffee retailers will feel big time this next year.
Rust blows. I took this photo in El Salvador in January of 2012. It devastated an enormous amount of the coffee growing areas of Central America in 2012, the results of which coffee retailers will feel big time this next year.

Think you know the answer? Then type it in in the comments section below, with your full name and country. And come back tomorrow at 10 a.m. to find out who will win this amazing Silverton Coffee/Tea Dripper from the awesome folks at Espresso Parts!

 

 

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Barista Magazine is the leading trade magazine in the world for the professional coffee community.

176 Comments

  1. As refernced in the August-September issue of Barista Magazine, Coffee Rust originated in Ceylan, which is in Guatemala.
    Coffee rust is a fungus that attacks coffee plants in specific, and can cause major damage to the crops, It causes yellowing of the leaves, not allowing the full amount of chlorophil to be absorbed, there by decreasing crop amounts and leading to mold.
    As mentioned in the article in Columbian Coffee Hub, it is being studied by the National Center for Coffee Research, (Cenicafe), and genetic improvements are being made to breed stronger, rust resistant plants.
    Recent studies have shown that the Castillo strain is producing more resilient, and vibrant cheries, as well as larger beans and and a wider range of enviromental adaptability.
    You can read more about this at BaristaMagazine.com, or at ColumbianCoffeeHub.com
    -Donny Morrison-

  2. Well, the article says Ceylan in 1861. However, I can’t find any evidence to support that. Rust and Robusta scholar Stuart McCook cites 1869, with a possibility of introduction in 1866. The 1869 date is supported by other scholars.

    FYI!

    Shawn Steiman – Honolulu, HI

  3. I suspect there is a typographical error while editing the magazine because Coffee Rust disease was found in “Ceylon” or the present day “Sri lanka” in 1861.

    Blessie Nelson
    USA

  4. in the year 1861 in Ceylan (never heard of that area, maybe Ceylon?)

    Christina Raehlert, Germany

  5. It was a rainy day in Ceylan, the year 1861. Rust had begun…

    Scott Satterwhite,
    North Carolina

  6. Rust was first discovered in Ceylan, Sri Lanka in 1861

    Lindsay Lee
    Asheville, North Carolina
    USA!

    OH MAN. Best prize ever.

  7. In 1861
    Farmers were not having fun.
    Ceylon’s coffee went bust
    When leaves started to rust.
    Once again, we’re under the gun.

    Ben Jones, Oly WA

  8. My mistake, I read that as Ceylon not Ceylan…

    “The “coffee leaf disease” was first reported by an English explorer on wild Coffea species in the Lake Victoria region of East Africa in 1861. In 1869, the Reverend H. J. Berkeley and his assistant, Mr. Broome, reporting in the Gardeners’ Chronicle, described the fungus they found associated with the disease on some dried coffee leaves sent from Ceylon (now Sri Lanka).”

    good reference here:

    http://www.apsnet.org/edcenter/intropp/lessons/fungi/Basidiomycetes/Pages/CoffeeRust.aspx

    Still it did manage to wipe out Ceylon’s coffee industry..

  9. it was discovered in Ceylan in 1861
    Scott Dillman United States

    Attended the rust panel at the SCAA in Boston this year and had no idea Ceylon only produces tea because of the rust outbreak in 1861 that wiped out their production, amazing…

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